Alexander Calls for Two-Year Budget to Give More Time for Oversight and Eliminate Unnecessary Programs

Cosponsors legislation to change current annual Congressional budget cycle to a two-year cycle

Posted on January 13, 2015

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“A two-year budget process would enable Congress to pass a two-year budget the first year, and spend the second year fixing broken programs and eliminating unnecessary spending. At a time when we are in the midst of a budget crisis, we need to pass a budget and spend more time reviewing spending and eliminating wasteful programs.” –Lamar Alexander

WASHINGTON, Jan. 13, 2014 – U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) today announced he is a cosponsor of legislation that would change the current annual Congressional budgeting cycle to a two-year (biennial) cycle, which would give Congress more time to review budget priorities and an additional year to conduct oversight to end unnecessary programs.

“A two-year budget process would enable Congress to pass a two-year budget the first year, and spend the second year fixing broken programs and eliminating unnecessary spending,” said Alexander. “At a time when we are in the midst of a budget crisis, we need to pass a budget and spend more time reviewing spending and eliminating wasteful programs.”

The Biennial Budget and Appropriations Act, introduced by Sens. Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.) and Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.), would change the current annual budget cycle to a two-year budget cycle, requiring the president to submit a biennial budget proposal in February and Congress to complete a concurrent budget resolution by May 15 and appropriations bills by October 1 in the first year. It would then require Congress to spend the second year reviewing programs and conducting oversight to eliminate wasteful spending.

As part of his focus on reining in federal spending, in February 2013, Alexander introduced the Fiscal Sustainability Act with Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) to reduce the growth of entitlement spending (Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security) by nearly $1 trillion in the next decade in order to improve the programs’ solvency.

Alexander is a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee.

 

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