Alexander: How to Prevent a United States Without Nuclear Power

Discusses the obstacles for nuclear energy, agenda as chairman of Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development

Posted on May 13, 2015

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“If we want a large amount of clean, cheap, reliable electricity available to power our 21st-century economy, then we need to do everything we can to make sure nuclear power continues to provide it. Relying on wind when nuclear plants are available is like going to war in sailboats when nuclear ships are available.”—Lamar Alexander

WASHINGTON, May, 13, 2015 – U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), the top Senate Republican on energy appropriations, spoke to energy policy leaders and professionals about how to overcome the real obstacles facing nuclear energy to help ensure a bright nuclear future in the United States.

“The United States uses nearly 25 percent of all the electricity in the world,” Alexander, who serves as chairman of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, said Tuesday. “If we want a large amount of clean, cheap, reliable electricity available to power our 21st-century economy, then we need to do everything we can to make sure nuclear power continues to provide it. Relying on wind when nuclear plants are available is like going to war in sailboats when nuclear ships are available.”

Alexander listed six steps to overcome the obstacles for nuclear energy and guide America towards a bright nuclear energy future:

1) invest in more research to safely extend nuclear reactor licenses from 60 to 80 years;

2) build small modular reactors;

3) end the nuclear waste stalemate, which should include completing Yucca Mountain and creating a pilot program for consolidated storage sites;

4) oppose the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan, which arbitrarily favors wind and solar over nuclear power ;

5) reduce the burden of overregulation; and,

6) end wasteful subsidies, like the wind production tax credit, and double energy research.

Alexander delivered his remarks at a Nuclear Energy Institute event in Washington, D.C. before energy policy leaders and professionals. The senator serves on the Senate Appropriations Committee, as well as the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee.

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