Politico Pro: Alexander hails Tennessee move on Common Core

Posted on October 22, 2014

Sen. Lamar Alexander today hailed Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision to put the Common Core standards to a public review, saying the process “will ensure that Tennessee families’ best interests come first, instead of the wishes of distant Washington bureaucrats.”Sen. Lamar Alexander today hailed Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision to put the Common Core standards to a public review, saying the process “will ensure that Tennessee families’ best interests come first, instead of the wishes of distant Washington bureaucrats.”

The review puts any decision on revising the Common Core off for more than a year — even though a group of conservative legislators has been pushing hard to repeal the standards in the coming legislative session.

The Tennessean called the move “a continuation of Haslam’s tone change on Common Core.” Though he has always publicly supported the standards, he is now opening every individual language arts and math standard up for public review — yet putting off any decisions for more than a year, by which point the public furor and conservative pressure to repeal the Common Core might have abated.

For his part, Alexander used the occasion to tout his bill to reinforce local control over standards and curriculum and end what he sees as federal overreach. All Republicans on the Senate education committee supported the bill, but Democrats defeated it.
“Governor Haslam, local school officials, and teachers know best what Tennessee’s nearly 1 million public school students need to know and be able to do,” Alexander said.

The review puts any decision on revising the Common Core off for more than a year — even though a group of conservative legislators has been pushing hard to repeal the standards in the coming legislative session.

The Tennessean called the move “a continuation of Haslam’s tone change on Common Core.” Though he has always publicly supported the standards, he is now opening every individual language arts and math standard up for public review — yet putting off any decisions for more than a year, by which point the public furor and conservative pressure to repeal the Common Core might have abated.

For his part, Alexander used the occasion to tout his bill to reinforce local control over standards and curriculum and end what he sees as federal overreach. All Republicans on the Senate education committee supported the bill, but Democrats defeated it.

“Governor Haslam, local school officials, and teachers know best what Tennessee’s nearly 1 million public school students need to know and be able to do,” Alexander said.