Chattanoogan: Garth Brooks To Perform In Nashville For First Time Since 1998

Posted on October 29, 2010

For the first time since 1998, Garth Brooks is returning to Nashville to perform Friday, Dec. 17, at 7 p.m. at the Bridgestone Arena, benefiting The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee in support of all those affected by the disastrous flooding this past spring.

Garth Brooks said, “I have watched with great pride how the volunteer state has pulled together to rise above the damage suffered by the floods.  It was a small church sign in Hendersonville that changed my life decades ago when I read, ‘Character is not created in crisis...it is revealed.’ Tennessee has shown amazing character through all of this and it is an honor to get to be a part of the healing process.”

The tickets will be $25 plus handling with the hope that even those who suffered might be able to attend. 100% of the $25 ticket will go to those in need. "There will be only one arena show we'll do this year and it will be in Nashville," said Brooks. Further ticketing and concert information will be released at 12 noon central time, Wednesday, Nov. 3.

Garth Brooks added, “Nashville is what young people dream of. As Miss Ellen said: disaster is only a disaster until the next one comes along. If you come to Vegas you'll see Garth Brooks and a guitar. If you come to Nashville you’ll see the band and me as you know us with the lighting and sound that you know. We are following in the footsteps of who already set the example. We are all Tennesseans helping Tennessee.”

The announcement was made Thursday morning from the State Capitol Building, with the attendance and support of Governor Phil Bredesen, Senator Lamar Alexander, Senator Bob Corker, Congressman Jim Cooper, Congressman Marsha Blackburn, Mayor Karl Dean and Ellen Lehman, president of The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee.

"The impact of May's flooding is still being felt in Tennessee as communities continue to rebuild," said Governor Bredesen. "I'm extremely pleased to see that the great outpouring of support for flood victims that was a hallmark of the early response continues, and I appreciate the leadership of all the members of Nashville's music family who, like Garth, have organized events or established funds to help Tennesseans rebuild their lives."

Senator Alexander said, “Many Tennesseans are still recovering from the biggest natural disaster since the president took office - floods that left 47 Tennessee counties declared disaster areas. The flooding didn’t get much national attention, in part because Tennesseans started cleaning up and helping each other instead of looting and complaining. I thank Garth for bringing Tennesseans together through his music and I know the proceeds from the concert, which he is generously contributing to the cleanup, will be put to good use helping people put their lives back together.”

Senator Corker said, "Because of the extraordinary compassion and commitment of our people, six months after the flood, Tennessee has made great progress, but the work is not done. I thank Garth for bringing his talents and energy to this cause. Music can be a powerful tool for good, and I hope the awareness and money this concert raises will help affected Tennesseans continue to recover and rebuild their lives and communities."

“I have been so proud of the way our community has responded to this disaster but we can’t forget that a lot of families are still recovering,” said Congressman Cooper. “Garth Brooks’ dedication to the long term flood recovery continues to show that the volunteer spirit in Music City is stronger than ever.”

"Our salvation from the spring floods was the abundance of talented, resourceful, and compassionate Tennesseans.  Garth is certainly one of those talented, compassionate, and generous. I am happy to join the Davidson County delegation in thanking him for his efforts," said Congressman Marsha Blackburn.

"The generous spirit of the music industry has been a tremendous help in Nashville's recovery, not only through direct financial support of telethons and concerts, but also by showing the world that we're still Music City and that we're open for business," Nashville Mayor Karl Dean said. "I appreciate Garth for using his talent and resources to bring attention to the ongoing needs of our community and state as we work hard to recover, and for holding an event that will draw visitors from around the country to come experience all that Nashville has to offer."